TRANSITION FROM KALI YUGA TO SATHYA YUGA

DISCIPLINE THAT SEEKS TO UNIFY THE SEVERAL EMPIRICAL INVESTIGATIONS OF HUMAN NATURE IN AN EFFORT TO UNDERSTAND INDIVIDUALS AS BOTH CREATURES OF THEIR ENVIRONMENT AND CREATORS OF THEIR OWN VALUES

THE WORLD ALWAYS INVISIBLY AND DANGEROUSLY REVOLVES AROUND PHILOSOPHERS

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OLDER IS THE PLEASURE IN THE HERD THAN THE PLEASURE IN THE EGO: AND AS LONG AS THE GOOD CONSCIENCE IS FOR THE HERD, THE BAD CONSCIENCE ONLY SAITH: EGO.

VERILY, THE CRAFTY EGO, THE LOVELESS ONE, THAT SEEKETH ITS ADVANTAGE IN THE ADVANTAGE OF MANY — IT IS NOT THE ORIGIN OF THE HERD, BUT ITS RUIN.

LOVING ONES, WAS IT ALWAYS, AND CREATING ONES, THAT CREATED GOOD AND BAD. FIRE OF LOVE GLOWETH IN THE NAMES OF ALL THE VIRTUES, AND FIRE OF WRATH.

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26 October 2011

Science of Revolution- Defeating Wall Street Banks and the Federal Reserve

by moneychanges on October 23, 2011

To what degree have large banks and corporations committed treason, war profiteering, theft, and usurped the power of our government? Has it gone so far that it would be the patriotic duty of Americans to have a revolution which restores economic liberties and constitutional representative government? If so how do we begin to do that?

There are large numbers of Americans and people around the world who are protesting right now and it seems to be about the same thing. It is a protest against an international cartel of corporations and banks employing the United States military, NATO, and its defense industries to advance a rotten international financial order and corporate agenda. Many governments of the world are being held captive by these interests and then being directed on how to make decisions.

To their credit, the Occupy Wall Street protests are in New York where the heart of the problem is. Protests are also directed less toward the occupied governments and more toward those powerful corporations which have control over government and are primarily responsible for the conditions of worldwide economic and political failure.

You say you want a revolution? The old Beatles song may have had a point or two but given what is happening today everything is not going to be alright. The song reflects some modern reality of how building support for a successful revolution can be easier said then done. In fact many revolutions in the history of world have turned out badly and not met the expectations of its participants. However we can learn something useful from the American experience of the 1700′s and 1800′s. It is here where there is true evidence of “exceptionalism” to this trend of revolutions that fail to succeed or deliver. It was difficult, but somehow Americans were able to blaze a trail of freedom which peoples and nations around the world were able to follow.

The big secret about the American revolution is that it had already taken place before 1776. The economic, social, financial, and political functions that were cemented following the revolution were already being practiced beforehand. The ideals of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness had been ingrained in the people’s personal live, commerce, and in the fabric of society.

Most of the colonies had flourished under the growing power of their representative governments who used their own debt free money called colonial scrip. Prior to the revolution Benjamin Franklin helped create or invent many public institutions and businesses such as post offices, newspapers, a library, an affordable public university, fire insurance, militia, and a fire department. Dr. Franklin was representative of the pre-revolutionary innovation and prosperity which defined America. By following the path of Franklin one is largely tracing the path of the American revolution from idea, to action, and then to manifestation.

Franklin founded the American Philosophical Society which brought together the greatest minds of America in the mid 1700′s. It was this society which drew together the majority of the revolutionary leaders well before 1776 . This is an affirmation of the social-scientific principle of revolution which requires people institute a change in society prior to initiating armed struggle, civil disobedience, or militarily action.

According to Benjamin Franklin, the British ignited the revolution when they outlawed a working system of colonial scrip and further went against the growing sentiments in America for representative government. By that time the foundation for a revolution was already in place and there were social and political networks of people ready to carry it out.

The lesson we can take from this example is that the seeds of a successful political or economic change must be planted and sprouted in a society before the revolution. From a perspective of revolutionary science: It is necessary to be the change and institute the change before the revolution starts rather then after. Fighting and resorting to armed conflict may be necessary in the end but we will always reap what we sow. Beware the revolution that sows nothing before it begins.

One aspect of the American Revolution that was incomplete and remains so today is in regard to banking and money. The War of 1812 was launched by Britain against the United States for what many feel was a refusal by the Congress to recharter the First Bank of the United States in 1811. Many believe this bank had become a tool for British and European subversion of America. With the conclusion of the War in 1815 the United States was in such dire financial straights it necessitated a Second Bank of the United States which was established in 1816 in Philadelphia.

However, in that same year of 1816 some of Philadelphia’s civic and business leaders lead by Condy Raguet founded the first savings bank in America. It may well be considered a non-violent and proactive solution to British influence over American Banking and finance. It was called the Philadelphia Savings Fund Society (PSFS). Incidentally the term “bank” had such a negative connotation at that time that the word “society” was used instead. PSFS was a savings bank which exemplified the scientific principle of revolution because it created a working institution rather than simply destroying one that was not working. It was an enterprise for the public good fueled by the Philadelphia momentum for liberty, prosperity, and civic responsibility that Benjamin Franklin had set in motion. While the Second Bank of the United States became corrupted and was short lived, the Philadelphia Savings Fund Society went on to become the largest and oldest savings bank in America.

The way in which Wall Street Banks and the Federal Reserve Banking System have completely corrupted our Federal government and society today represents a defeat of the American Revolution. It signifies a tragic end to what individuals like Benjamin Franklin worked so hard for and risked their life fighting for. If the American System of Benjamin Franklin is to die it is only because that spirit has died within the American People today. Likewise it can only live if the spirit of the 1776 revolution abides in the soul of the American people. The task we have been given today is to complete that revolution as it relates to International banks and the corporations which have grown up around them.

Private banks and corporations have effective rule over our country and a good part of the world. Lobbying and attacking the government seems to have no effect on them, thus something more is needed. At some point aren’t we obliged to accept responsibility for being the bankers and CEO’s that we wish to see in the world, and create institutions to replace the failed ones?. It is in that course of action that the seeds of real change are planted in today’s revolution. This approach to revolution gives life to new political and economic realities which can maintain representative government in the long term. A revolution to change Wall Street and the banking system can begin at any time without marching, protesting, or firing a single shot. All that is required is for more people to channel their energy, money, and the growing political ferment into constructive action.

Long term comprehensive financial reform is needed, but no clear consensus of support exists on how to do it. The process needs to move forward and the grip of banking interests over the Federal Government needs to be broken. A good first step toward reform should begin by shifting all deposits out of large international banks and into small local ones. That kind of action is within the power of every citizen. New publicly owned banks can also be established at the state and local level on the model of the Bank of North Dakota and the Reconstruction Finance Corporation. There is presently trillions of dollars in public money which belongings to cities, counties, states, and pension funds which remains idle or largely invested in Wall Street and large international financial institutions. This money can be put to better use in new publicly owned banks and investment trusts which will invest it in their respective local economies.

Creating a recovery is the basis for getting the financial crises in order. We have millions of people in desperate financial situation and the only way to help them is by creating jobs through investments of large capital in infrastructure, new energy production, and general economic development. Creating new banks with public money is a win-win because it will simultaneously reduce the size of to-big-too-fail banks.

This would not be the end of financial reform rather just the beginning. However, no real reform is likely to happen until the public stops enabling the banks with trillions of deposits. The assumption that Federal officials can or will step up or step in to fix things at some point when Wall Street Protests get large enough is misguided.

Change of this kind must begin with each person and can be quite effective at the local government level. Thankfully we have those options and are not bound or limited to waiting on the Federal Government nor to protesting alone. Occupy Wall Street has been a much needed wake up call which hopefully can continue until long term political and financial reform is accomplished. But it is now time for protests to focus on getting state and local governments to move their money out of Wall Street and to create new banks for holding deposits of public money.

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